ACT

The ACT is almost a necessity for college admission, and it’s always the best to do as well as possible.

 

test
image from Vimeo

Ohio is a state that has 73% of students taking the test, with an average of a twenty-two point composite score as of 2015.

 

For other state’s scores, see                                                          http://blog.prepscholar.com/act-scores-by-state-averages-highs-and-lows

Approximately 78% of colleges consider the importance of test scores, although it is all taken with the rest of your information on an application. Regardless, ACT and SAT scores are important. Scholarships and special recognition may even be awarded to high scores.

This year, Field High School is generously allowing the junior class to take the ACT for free at school, using time out of the school day for the exam. At the end of March, all juniors will be attending and taking the test. In order to take CCP (College Credit Plus), the composite score that has to be achieved is at least a twenty-one. The larger the number, the more scholarships and money received.

tips
Image from mageewp

-Rest the night before, get a lot of sleep.

-Take as many practice ACTs as possible, every practice question is helpful

-The Math section is sixty answers in sixty minutes, so try to always stay with your first guess, and go back if there is enough time.

-In English, watch out for pronouns, misuse of verb to subject, and sentence structure. If it looks wrong, it probably is, and if not, use the “No Change” answer choice.

-Reading, especially if not a particularly fast reader, focus on main ideas, and write in the margins as much as necessary.

-Science, focus on main ideas such as the variables, trends, and objects being measured.

-Skip difficult questions, it is time consuming and time does not need to be wasted on a question that is a toss-up if it is going to be correct when all is done.

-Fill in every bubble, better to take a guess than to miss it for sure.

-Stay calm, stress is not good in a test environment.

Info from Prepscholar

Info from Peterson’s Test Scores

Feature Image from act.org

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s